Apollo 13 Trivia: Week 3

This month we are highlighting all things Apollo 13. You may recall this notable mission due to the hit blockbuster film. Think you can sort fact from fiction? Test your knowledge below!

What challenge did the Apollo 13 crew face following the crippling oxygen tank explosion?

Apollo 13 spacecraft
Correct! Wrong!

There were many challenges the crew of Apollo 13 faced following the explosion. Carbon Dioxide buildup was a problem. The crew had enough lithium hydroxide canisters (which remove Carbon Dioxide from the spacecraft), but the Command Module's square canisters could not fit inside the Lunar Module's round openings. Just as the Carbon Dioxide was mounting to dangerous levels in the Lunar Module, Mission Control devised a workaround with onboard materials (tape, cardboard, and plastic bags) to get the canisters to fit. This became one of the more famous spaceflight emergency "fixes". Power was also an issue. NASA Ground controllers came up with a plan to charge the Command Module with the Lunar Module. Non-essential systems were turned off to conserve energy. Consumption was reduced to a fifth of what it had been! However, this created an extremely cold environment for the crew. The temperature inside the spacecraft dropped close to freezing, and condensation formed on the walls, which made it very difficult for the crew to get any sleep. According to NASA, water was the main consumable concern. It was estimated that the crew would run out of water five hours prior to Earth reentry. Thus, the crew had to ration their water supply, taking in only six ounces of water per day (a fifth of what they normally consumed). They used fruit juices and ate "wet" foods to supplement their fluid intake. Nevertheless, the crew became dehydrated and set an Apollo weight loss record, losing a combined total of 31.5 pounds, 50 percent more than any other Apollo crew! Learn more about the Apollo 13 mission with our Apollo 13 Virtual Exhibit!

Apollo 13: Week 3
Nice try!

You almost got this week's trivia question! There were many challenges the crew of Apollo 13 faced following the explosion. Carbon Dioxide buildup was a problem. The crew had enough lithium hydroxide canisters (which remove Carbon Dioxide from the spacecraft), but the Command Module's square canisters could not fit inside the Lunar Module's round openings. Just as the Carbon Dioxide was mounting to dangerous levels in the Lunar Module, Mission Control devised a workaround with onboard materials (tape, cardboard, and plastic bags) to get the canisters to fit. This became one of the more famous spaceflight emergency "fixes". Power was also an issue. NASA Ground controllers came up with a plan to charge the Command Module with the Lunar Module. Non-essential systems were turned off to conserve energy. Consumption was reduced to a fifth of what it had been! However, this created an extremely cold environment for the crew. The temperature inside the spacecraft dropped close to freezing, and condensation formed on the walls, which made it very difficult for the crew to get any sleep. According to NASA, water was the main consumable concern. It was estimated that the crew would run out of water five hours prior to Earth reentry. Thus, the crew had to ration their water supply, taking in only six ounces of water per day (a fifth of what they normally consumed). They used fruit juices and ate "wet" foods to supplement their fluid intake. Nevertheless, the crew became dehydrated and set an Apollo weight loss record, losing a combined total of 31.5 pounds, 50 percent more than any other Apollo crew! Learn more about the Apollo 13 mission with our Apollo 13 Virtual Exhibit!
You got it!

You got this week's trivia question correct! There were many challenges the crew of Apollo 13 faced following the explosion. Carbon Dioxide buildup was a problem. The crew had enough lithium hydroxide canisters (which remove Carbon Dioxide from the spacecraft), but the Command Module's square canisters could not fit inside the Lunar Module's round openings. Just as the Carbon Dioxide was mounting to dangerous levels in the Lunar Module, Mission Control devised a workaround with onboard materials (tape, cardboard, and plastic bags) to get the canisters to fit. This became one of the more famous spaceflight emergency "fixes". Power was also an issue. NASA Ground controllers came up with a plan to charge the Command Module with the Lunar Module. Non-essential systems were turned off to conserve energy. Consumption was reduced to a fifth of what it had been! However, this created an extremely cold environment for the crew. The temperature inside the spacecraft dropped close to freezing, and condensation formed on the walls, which made it very difficult for the crew to get any sleep. According to NASA, water was the main consumable concern. It was estimated that the crew would run out of water five hours prior to Earth reentry. Thus, the crew had to ration their water supply, taking in only six ounces of water per day (a fifth of what they normally consumed). They used fruit juices and ate "wet" foods to supplement their fluid intake. Nevertheless, the crew became dehydrated and set an Apollo weight loss record, losing a combined total of 31.5 pounds, 50 percent more than any other Apollo crew! Learn more about the Apollo 13 mission with our Apollo 13 Virtual Exhibit!

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